Nanaimo, Vancouver Island/Coast

Mallory Woods Youth Coaching

Nanaimo, Vancouver Island/Coast


Mallory Woods Youth Coaching provides one-on-one, remote coaching for youth ages 9-19, with a dedication to connection, collaboration and combining innovative supportive modalities. Mallory specializes in working with youth, LGBTQ+ matters and themes surrounding identity. Additionally, Mx. Woods is a keynote speaker, educator and facilitator who, as a former youth in Government care, speaks as an advocate for local and federal youth empowerment. Mallory Woods Youth Coaching is dedicated to creating low-barrier support that welcomes youth and families as they are.


1 Employees

In Business Since 2017

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Mallory Woods Youth Coaching has been nominated in the following categories:

Click on the banners to find out why they deserve your vote in each category.

Best Community Impact


What motivated you to start your business and what core cause do you support?

At sixteen, I was homeless and mentally ill. I watched my peers and I struggle to connect with supports we couldn't relate to and who, it felt like, couldn't relate to us. I was determined to become a support who youth relate too and to turn my hardship into medicine for others. This is why connection, trust, and collaboration are at the heart of everything I do. I work to ensure that each youth I work with feels seen, heard, and understood exactly as they are. In 2017 I connected with my coaching mentor, Ross Tayler, who introduced me to Co-active Coaching, a model which facilitates the kind of collaborative, trauma-informed and connection-based work I was passionate about providing for youth. As a teenager, when I dreamed about the work I wanted to do, I knew that creating a foundation of connection, trust and friendship was necessary to supporting youth. Now, as a coach, I act on those values, providing coaching which is rooted in connection, collaboration, and combining innovative supportive modalities. I operate from the belief that youth are faced with complex hardships, but that, given the opportunity for support, they will take even the smallest advantage and leverage it to create beautiful lives. This assumes that youth are resourceful, driven, and capable of bettering their lives if given the chance. I build as many opportunities as possible for those “chances” into my framework.

Why do you deserve to win the Best Community Impact award?

I was deeply touched to receive a nomination for the Community Impact Award. It is a sign that I am successfully exhibiting the values that are at the core of Mallory Woods Youth Coaching. My core values have always been to provide accessible, inclusive, and thoughtful care which prioritizes youth’s individual comfort and recognizes the unique process of adolescents. Receiving this nomination tells me that others are seeing how my values have been braided into the structuring of my practice and that my community recognizes the work I have put into making my practice an open invitation to ‘come as you are’, however that may be. I strive every day to create a positive impact in the lives of the youth and families I work with. If that qualifies me for this award, I am humbled and honoured. My goal to continue community care and outreach will be forever in the hope of sparking a positive impact in the lives of youth. To win “Best Community Impact” would be to highlight the work I am most proud of; positively impacting individual lives as means to support a healthier, happier collective. Thank you for your consideration.

Best Solopreneur


What motivated you to start your business? What challenges did you overcome as a Solopreneur?

At sixteen, I was homeless and mentally ill. During this time, my peers and I struggled to connect with supports who could understand our realities. I was determined to become a support youth could relate to and to turn my hardship into medicine. My coaching practice is the result of that determination. In 2017 I connected with my coaching mentor, Ross Tayler, who introduced me to Co-active Coaching. I had always known I was going to help people but I didn't know how. I started my practice as a slow-burn, labour of love, which I made available, regardless of cost, to any family who needed it. I had no framework and no understanding of the structure of operating a business. The result was a practice that overflowed with love and passion, had amazing results and feedback, but lacked any semblance of structure. This past year I have worked endlessly to correct this. I rebranded as Mallory Woods Youth Coaching and started to cultivate a practice that is both structurally sound and full of love. Being the sole force behind my business keeps me near constantly enthralled in my work. However, compound with being a full-time university student for the last two years, maintaining a 4.0 GPA, volunteering as a youth advocate and working a day job as a behavioural interventionist, my schedule (and energy depletion) can be challenging to say the least. If I didn’t love and believe in what I do as much as I do, it would be impossible. However, truthfully, even at its most shattering, being a Solopreneur is a challenge I will rise to, again and again. Not because it is easy, but because it is my absolute pleasure to be able to support youth and any occupational hardships I maneuver are the price I pay to be able to do what I love.

Why do you deserve to win the Best Solopreneur award?

I am a neurodiverse, non-binary, high school dropout who battled child maltreatment, homelessness, and mental illness. As a child, I was told I would not be able to survive, let alone succeed in life. I divulge this because to simply say I am proud of what I have created would ignore the disadvantages I was presented with and the scope of the endeavour it has been to get to where I am now. I believe I am a worthy recipient of the Best Solopreneur because I have juggled all the complications of having a life that started as mine did, university and maintaining “Dean’s List” quality grades, volunteering and speaking publicly as the Youth Representative on the committee for the Youth Futures Education Fund, a day job, and creating and operating a quickly growing business which, in the first two months of 2021, surpassed its net revenue of 2020. I believe I absolutely embody the characteristics which make us solopreneurs so noteworthy: resiliency, both personally and professionally, unshakeable passion to do right by our cause, and the deep-rooted ambition to create a better world through the work we do, often at great personal sacrifice. Thank you for your consideration.

Best Youth Entrepreneur


What motivated you to start your business and what is your vision for the future of your company?

At sixteen, I was homeless and mentally ill. During this time, I watched my peers and I struggle to connect with supports we couldn't relate to and who, it felt like, couldn't relate to us. I was determined to become a support youth could relate to and to turn my hardship into medicine. My coaching practice is the result of that determination. In 2017 I connected with my coaching mentor, Ross Tayler, who introduced me to Co-active Coaching. Since then, I have worked with youth and their families, been a speaker and advocate for youth services, and facilitated educational and community-building workshops. My three-year goal is to continue facilitating workshops, speaking publicly, coaching youth and to establish a community of mentors who will virtually share their skills, resources, and tools with youth looking for support in specific areas of their life. The finite resources within my business are my time and skills as a coach. I estimate I have the capacity for thirty active accounts, each with a weekly forty-five-minute session. To fill this capacity is my five-year plan. My long-term goal is to found a center where multiple youth-focused health workers and facilitators can provide services for youth. This collection will act as a hub of resources and supports and bring together multiple different practices to be used in tandem or singularity. Also, I plan to continue speaking publicly, coaching and advocating for youth.

Why do you deserve to win the Best Youth Entrepreneur award?

I believe I deserve Best Youth Entrepreneur because my business exceeds the criteria and is making measurable positive changes for the youth and families I work with. Furthermore, my work is a remedial counter to what Children First Canada’s Raising Canada 2020 report deems the second biggest threat to youth, “poor mental health” (p.16 https://childrenfirstcanada.org/raising-canada). My plans to build a virtual community of resources for youth, and to eventually extend that community into a center dedicated to supporting youth, in addition to my continued work as a speaker and coach, has been my dream and goal for as long as I can remember. I am routinely meeting my milestones and as I do, I am watching my dream transform into my daily work. I believe I have clear goals, a reasonable timeline, and achievable expectations. Over my last 3 years of coaching and, particularly since rebranding in 2020 as Mallory Woods Youth Coaching, I have watched how my little labour of love has grown tiny baby legs and begun wobbling around on its own. In the first two months of 2021, I exceeded my net revenue for 2020 and am on track to continue this trajectory. I am seeing increased engagement, revenue, and customer value, all of which are mirrored by the affirming responses I have been receiving from those accessing my services. Finally, the extensive positive feedback, results from evidence-based strategies, testimonials, and various award nominations I have received, bolster my belief that I am bringing positive change to my community and that, through my youth coaching, I am helping to build solid foundations for younger generations to grow from, ensuring healthier, happier, and more emotionally articulate future communities. As a neurodivergent, non-binary, former youth in Government Care, I am incredibly proud of what I have overcome in my short life. Each obstacle I have maneuvered has only strengthened my resolve that there needs to be more, and newly imagined, resources for youth. Too many of us slip through the cracks. If I can help a handful of youth to build a strong base on which the rest of their lives can be built, I will consider myself wildly successful and I hope you would too. Thank you for your consideration.

Nominations and voting has now closed.